A WHITE HISTORIAN READS BLACK HISTORY

UPCOMING TALKS:
  • A WHITE HISTORIAN CONFRONTS RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION
    • November 18, 1:00 pm – Friends Meeting of Washington, DC
    • February 10, 2019 – Bethesda Presbyterian Church
    • February 16, 2019, 3:00 pm – home of Judy Byron and Rick Reinhard, Washington, DC – RSVP judy@judybyron.com
    • April 10, 2019, 12:00 pm – Shepherd University Lifelong Learning, Shepherdstown, WV
  • A WHITE HISTORIAN EXPLORES BLACK VOTING RIGHTS
    • February 17, 2019, 3:00 pm – home of Judy Byron and Rick Reinhard, Washington, DC – RSVP judy@judybyron.com

In June, 2015, when I heard about the nine murders at a bible study class at Charleston’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, I was preparing to get together with friends I sang “We Shall Overcome” with during the early 1960s. We had met as high school students, in seminars and workcamps sponsored by the American Friends Service Committee. The older kids in my crowd joined the Mississippi Freedom Summer project in 1964, but even the youngest among us had picketed our hometown Woolworth’s to support the sit-ins at Southern lunch counters. As a fifteen-year-old white girl, I stood on the National Mall in 1963 and heard Martin Luther King describe a dream that I understood as mine, too.

Fifty years later, I retired from my position as a university professor of American history. I had taught some African American history in the US History survey course, but it was not my research specialty. My books and articles concern the intersection between our daily lives and the public world. My teaching emphasized that history is not a collection of facts, but a way of thinking about how things change.

I bring these perspectives to this project, “A White Historian Reads Black History.”  Responding to Charleston, to police shootings, and to #BlackLivesMatter, I began my series of illustrated talks in February 2016, with “A White Historian Confronts American Slavery.” My talk on lynching launched in October of that year; I have been honored to share the stage for that presentation with poet Marcia Cole, whose artistic take on the subject complements my intellectual and visual one. My third talk, first offered in October 2017, is about voting rights, a topic on many minds as Americans anticipate the 2018 and 2020 elections. Each talk is illustrated with more than 50 historical photographs, maps, and charts. My fourth talk, on residential segregation, was first delivered  in October 2018.

My goal is to delve deeper into these crucial chapters of American history than most white people usually do. I believe that history offers a way for us to become honest with ourselves; my aspiration is to be of service to others who, like me, are grappling with  contemporary issues of race and racism. In doing this work,  I have met many people interested in going beyond simplistic accounts of the past that confirm what they already know.

Mark Greiner, former pastor of the Takoma Park Presbyterian Church, wrote about my first  talk: “The lecture so evocatively described our shared history and its ongoing legacies and struggles. Further, you modeled how a white person / scholar can struggle into owned history.  You simultaneously ‘performed’ history and solidarity.  I was struck that the audience was eager to say, ‘yes, and we need to look at even more history.’  What an affirmation of the rich vein you’ve tapped.  Sobered, delighted with and inspired by your work…..”

TO  SPONSOR THE SERIES OR A SINGLE TALK, CONTACT SUSAN [AT] SUSANSTRASSER.NET

A WHITE HISTORIAN CONFRONTS AMERICAN SLAVERYFLYER and READING LIST

A WHITE HISTORIAN CONFRONTS LYNCHINGFLYER and READING LIST

A WHITE HISTORIAN EXPLORES BLACK VOTING RIGHTSFLYER and READING LIST

A WHITE HISTORIAN CONFRONTS RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION – FLYER and READING LIST

LIST OF TALKS DELIVERED AND SCHEDULED

RECENT PUBLICITY:
  • I gave a talk and interview at Amerika Haus in Vienna, Austria, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s assassination.  They made a little video.  Copyright US Embassy, Vienna.
  • Marcia Cole and I appeared on Lynn Borton’s “Choose to be Curious,” audio online.

Historian

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